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loki

Honoring the Dead

It appears that a great deal of my food for thought in my journal anymore comes from other conversations. Ah well, genius doesn't exist in a vacuum afterall. One of the mailing lists I'm on recently had a post from someone who is Asatru, wondering if she should honor her recently deceased grandmother, since she was Southern Baptist.


So much of our tradition is focused around honoring the ancestors, acknowledging what they have done to get us here. Regardless of how your religious views and hers may differ, that didn't mean that you didn't honor her in life, yes?

So in my opinion there's no harm in continuing to honor her. Speaking of her and detailing the varied reasons why you loved and respected her. If you think about it, our ancient fore-fathers travelled alot, traded alot, and enjoyed cultural and biological exchanges between them and others despite religious differences.

I think you do more harm to just cut them out. Our wyrd, our orlog, our hamingja is all because of all those who came before us.

Granted would I conduct a whole ritual for her? No. But I'd certainly continue to remember and honor her. That is the important part. It's up to you I think in how you choose to do that. But flowers left on a gravesite mean the same whether your Christian or Asatru. Sharing memories of her with friends and family, especially taking the time to tell that to the next generation in your family is important. A family dinner and a toast to your grandmother, is non-denominational, and yet still honors her.

Comments

I agree. Both my lines are present on my stall and are Honored both as Ancestors and as grandparents. I'd like to think that my Matrilinial Grandma would have been Heathen if she'd known about it. My Patrilinial? I loved them as grandparents even though as very Catholic and manipulative(they never really forgave Dad for marrying a Divorce...)...
Truth,
Pat
agreed.

--zen

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